Pause A Moment And Let’s Discuss Your Posture

postureYour posture is important as you work out and train – and for every aspect of your life. Unless your job entails heavy labor or construction, chances are you go from sitting all day, to sitting on the sofa at night, to heading off to bed (hopefully, with your workout included in the mix). If you have a tight, achy back, sore shoulders or stiff joints, you’re not alone.

If you sit at a computer all day, in a hunched position, your posture is suffering. Bad posture while sitting or standing can directly affect your back, neck and shoulders. Just sitting upright in a chair for long periods can wreak havoc on your alignment, especially if you’re sitting in a chair without lumbar support. Your mom may have encouraged you to “Stand up straight” and to hold yourself straight and tall. If you are a sloucher, your back rounds, your head tilts forward, and with it, your shoulders. Slouching makes you more prone to tendonitis, rotator cuff pain or arthritis. And, by the way, slouching also makes you look older. So, slouch-not!

Tip: Have someone take a picture of you, standing, from the side. You will be able to easily evaluate your posture.

  • What is proper sitting posture? Starting at the top of your head, your ears should be over your shoulders, and your shoulders should be over your hips in a fairly straight line. Your chair does make a Your lower back should be supported by an ergonomic chair that fits you or one that has a lumbar cushion. When you sit at your desk, your knees should bend at 90-degrees and your feet should be flat on the floor. Your elbows should bend at 90-degrees, your wrists should remain neutral, and your eyes should be slightly cast downward.
  • What is proper standing posture? For good standing, posture keep a straight line from your head to your ears, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles. Reach your head high, lengthen your neck and gently pull in your chin. Work at consciously keeping your abdominal muscles tight. Keep your shoulder blades down and back, and don’t lock your knees.

Dr. Silverman is a great resource as well as an amazing surgeon. Call for a consultation, today!

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